Aunque todo lo dicho no sea cierto, todo lo cierto no está dicho.

While not all that is said is true, not all that is truth is told.

Evo’s victory and the future of Latin America

EvoMoralesEvo’s victory shows that in Latin America and the Caribbean, when it is the people who decide, they decide for progress, justice and the independence of each and the unity of all. The minimum wage was increased from 440 bolivianos ($63 USD) in 2005 to 1200 bolivianos ($173 USD) in 2013. At the same time, urban unemployment fell from 8.1% to 3.2%, the lowest rate of all countries in Latin America. By Manuel E. Yepe. October 25, 2014. A CubaNews translation. Edited by Walter Lippmann. http://www.walterlippmann.com/docs4206.html, http://manuelyepe.wordpress.com/

Evo’s victory and the future of Latin America

The predictions became fact and it was shown that Evo Morales has a level of approval never before seen by any president in Bolivia after his term. Evo will become the president to rule Bolivia longer than any other in the history of the country. He can already be credited as being one of the most successful presidents in the history of Latin America.

Morales, 54, became president of Bolivia in 2006 and was the first indigenous president of the country with the largest number of followers among the indigenous population (62% of the country´s inhabitants, according to figures from the United Nations Development Program, UNDP). The recovery of the state of Bolivia and the redistribution of wealth have been his primary goals.

In proclaiming the victory given by the popular will, Morales said: “this has been a triumph of the dignity and sovereignty of the Bolivian people.” He attributed the victory to his “anti-colonial and anti-capitalist” people and dedicated it to Fidel Castro, “historic leader of the Cuban Revolution”, to Hugo Chavez “eternal commander of the Bolivarian Revolution”, and to “all those who fight for the liberation of Bolivia”.

Evo’s victory showed that there is no point trying to prevent the re-election of a president when the popular will confirms its confidents as it evidently was in the case of Evo Morales. It would be undemocratic to impose a time limit to his term other than what the voters decide at the polls. This is all the more so when that popular will is the consequence of an exemplary performance in an earlier presidential term. The people have the certainty that the country’s electoral system is able to accurately reflect their verdict.

In 2005, Evo Morales, his Vice-President Alvaro Garcia Linera, and his Movimiento al Socialismo (MAS) [Movement Toward Socialism] assumed the leadership of a fragmented country, in which racist prejudices against the discriminated native populations of the continent, and with an extreme poverty in no way attributable to a lack of natural resources for development, quite the opposite!

A balances sheet of the goals and accomplishments of the transformative process Evo Morales has led shows a unique combination of nationalization of the basic resources of the country, with wide social policies to redistribute its wealth. Together with this, he achieved a significant increase in the country’s financial reserves to serve these objectives.

But the revolutionary combination of these factors in the economic field would not have sufficed to bring Bolivia, from the backward place it occupied in the continent just a decade ago, to the position it occupies now in many aspects of political and social development. The results of the post-neo-liberal economic model implemented by Evo Morales are the result of the nationalization of hydrocarbons which allowed the country, at first, to almost triple the per capita GDP (from US $ 1,010 in 2005 to US $ 2,757). The international reserves of the country grew from US $ 1,714 million in 2005 to US $ 14,430 in 2013.

The minimum wage was increased from 440 bolivianos ($63 USD) in 2005 to 1200 bolivianos ($173 USD) in 2013. At the same time, urban unemployment fell from 8.1% to 3.2%, the lowest rate of all countries in Latin America. Extreme poverty in Bolivia has been reduced from 38.2% in 2005 to 21.6%  in 2012. Since 2011, Bolivia was no longer the poorest country in Latin America. Now, it is Paraguay.

The reduction of inequality (measured by the income difference between the richest 10% and the poorest 10%) that was 128 times in 2005 was decreased to 46 times in 2012.

While thanking the confidence of his people, Evo stressed that “there was a debate between two models here: privatization and nationalization.” And certainly the presidential election in Bolivia is part of a larger debate taking place in all Latin America. These days, the debate expects further strong responses in Brazil and Uruguay.

By means of repression and bloodshed –Operation Condor included– the oligarchies and the continental hegemonic power managed to stop for a long time the coming to power of true representatives of the peoples. But whenever the Latin American people succeed in carrying out a truly democratic referendum, free from fraud and manipulation, in order to obtain fair governance, those elected are the candidates most loyal to popular interests.

Evo’s victory shows that in Latin America and the Caribbean, when it is the people who decide, they decide for progress, justice and the independence of each and the unity of all.

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This entry was posted on October 29, 2014 by in America Latina, Bolivia, Clase Obrera / Working Class, Human Rights / Derechos Humanos, Pobreza and tagged , .

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