Aunque todo lo dicho no sea cierto, todo lo cierto no está dicho.

While not all that is said is true, not all that is truth is told.

No longer conspiracy theorists fantasies. Social apps’ hidden price tag: the reams of data about ourselves that we give away.

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Ever played Farmville? Checked into Foursquare? Get directions from Google? Listened to music on Pandora? Beside advertisement, these social apps come with a more hidden price tag: the reams of data about ourselves that we give away.  Harris Corporation provides technology to the FBI to track  where we go; Glimmerglass builds tools to intercept our overseas calls; James Bimen Associates design software to hack into our computers; Acxiom monitor our Google searches to sell all the information they can get.No longer the fantasies of conspiracy theorists, these technologies are routinely installed in our data devices. Surveillance companies sell their products to the government. Paid with our tax dollars but we have no control over them. October 9, 2013. IPA, Institute for Public Accuracy.

Pratap Chatterjee is executive director of CorpWatch and author of Halliburton’s Army and Iraq, Inc. He just wrote the piece “The Data Hackers Mining Your Information for Big Brother,” which states: “Big Bro is watching you. Inside your mobile phone and hidden behind your web browser are little known software products marketed by contractors to the government that can follow you around anywhere. No longer the wide-eyed fantasies of conspiracy theorists, these technologies are routinely installed in all of our data devices by companies that sell them to Washington for a profit.

“That’s not how they’re marketing them to us, of course. No, the message is much more seductive: Data, Silicon Valley is fond of saying, is the new oil. And the Valley’s message is clear enough: we can turn your digital information into fuel for pleasure and profits — if you just give us access to your location, your correspondence, your history, and the entertainment that you like.

“Ever played Farmville? Checked into Foursquare? Listened to music on Pandora? These new social apps come with an obvious price tag: the annoying advertisements that we believe to be the fee we have to pay for our pleasure. But there’s a second, more hidden price tag — the reams of data about ourselves that we give away. …

“But there is a second kind of data company of which most people are unaware: high-tech outfits that simply help themselves to our information in order to allow U.S. government agencies to dig into our past and present. Some of this is legal, since most of us have signed away the rights to our own information on digital forms that few ever bother to read, but much of it is, to put the matter politely, questionable.

“This second category is made up of professional surveillance companies. They generally work for or sell their products to the government — in other words, they are paid with our tax dollars — but we have no control over them. Harris Corporation provides technology to the FBI to track, via our mobile phones, where we go; Glimmerglass builds tools that the U.S. intelligence community can use to intercept our overseas calls; and companies like James Bimen Associates design software to hack into our computers.

“There is also a third category: data brokers like Arkansas-based Acxiom. These companies monitor our Google searches and sell the information to advertisers. They make it possible for Target to offer baby clothes to pregnant teenagers, but also can keep track of your reading habits and the questions you pose to Google on just about anything from pornography to terrorism, presumably to sell you Viagra and assault rifles.”

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Institute for Public Accuracy. 980 National Press Building, Washington, D.C. 20045. (202) 347-0020 * http://www.accuracy.org * ipa@accuracy.org

 

 

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